Doc Joins Darkest Hour Filling in on Guitar for European Tour

So the cat is out of the bag. I will be filling in on guitar for my homey Mike Lonestar from the the legendary Darkest Hour on a short European run. This is an incredible opportunity and I couldn’t be more excited. Thanks to everyone in the band and for having me aboard. I’ll do my best to do you fellas proud.

Euro tour ticket link:
http://smarturl.it/DarkestHourEU2017

April 29 Dunkerque, France Les 4 Ecluses
April 30 Birmingham, UK The Flapper
May 1 Cardiff, UK CLWB Ifor Bach
May 2 London, UK The Underworld Camden
May 3 Cologne, Germany Underground
May 4 Haarlem, Netherlands Patronaat
May 5 Aarschot, Belgium De Klinker
May 6 Hamburg, Germany Hafenrock-Festival
May 7 Copenhagen, Denmark Beta
May 8 Berlin, Germany Cassiopeia
May 9 Warsaw, Poland Poglos
May 10 Praha, Czech Republic 007
May 11 Leipzig, Germany Conne Island
May 12 Munchen, Germany Feierwerk/Hansa 39
May 13 Bezrik Landstrasse, Austria Viper Room

This Is The End

Headbangers ball

“This is the end!” This is the emphatic, anthemic line in the God Forbid opening track from the album IV: Constitution of Treason, which was released during the peak of our powers in 2005. In fact, it wasn’t the end. The end came much later. At the time, it felt like we were invincible, destined for heavy metal immortality. And we were in the lower tier of the NWOAHM (or Metalcore or whatever you want to call it) in all metrics for determining the success or popularity of bands. If you look at album, ticket, and merchandise sales, Myspace friends, Youtube views, Facebook “likes”, or the ever mystical buzz on the street, God Forbid was probably never half as big as any of the rest of the Big 4 of Quitters (I should trade mark this) including Bleeding Through, Shadows Fall, and now Chimaira. Knowing that, even we felt invincible. That’s how intoxicating achieving any discernible success with your art can be. Shadows Fall and Chimaira hanging it up in the last couple weeks have brought an outpouring of sadness, shock and disappointment from fans. It seems like the end of an era, and maybe it is.

Hearing that these great bands are moving on makes me sad and disappointed, but not shocked. The truth is that amongst peers a good majority of our conversations have to do with figuring out how to stay relevant by finding new audiences, getting great tours, signing with the right label, writing the next game changing album, and more. Teetering on the edge of existence has been much of our collective realities for half of our careers. As the O.G. quitter, I’m here to explain why this is happening and why you shouldn’t be surprised.

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